Andrey Listopadov

Categories / programming

Lately, I’ve been working on async.fnl in my spare time and realized that the previous code that I used to schedule timers was terrible. Well, realized isn’t an appropriate word here, because I knew it back when I first implemented it, I just didn’t bother to make it better until I had a fully working library.
Well, this was fun! A bit exhausting, actually. The first of five months of the challenge has ended and here are the results: Play Game1 on itch.io The game isn’t really complete, but I did my best to make it feel as complete as possible in the time constraints I had.
This post is midway through the last week I have to work on the game in a platforming genre. And it’s a bit of a shame because currently, I’m having a blast - now that the physics and camera are in place the game already feels like a playable thing.
Who knew that writing a post about how I’ve procrastinated for two whole weeks instead of following my own challenge would be so motivating? Immediately after I posted the previous post on Monday, I regained interest and started working on physics integration. Well, making a platformer without experience turned out to be harder than I thought, though I got stuck on things that are not platformer specific.
After I explored asynchronous programming in my first naive implementation a few years ago, I was hooked on the idea of asynchronous communication in programs. Motivated to take this concept further I’ve created the fennel-async library that I’ve shown at FennelConf 2022. While this library works, and I’ve managed to write a simple socket-based REPL and integrate it into Emacs as an experiment, I wasn’t satisfied with the implementation.
Recently I read a post by @nikitonsky about writing a custom REPL for Clojure and Sublime Text. What got my attention was a way of implementing a protocol over a plain Clojure REPL. In the post, Nikita describes a way to “upgrade” the connection by sending code that basically implements a new REPL to the main REPL process.
TIL that Emacs Lisp has had generators since 2016, and generators are a cool feature in any language in my opinion! In short, Emacs has the generator.el package as it’s part since version 25.1. The generators are implemented via transforming code and act like iterators, even most of the functions are called iter-something.
Another post in the not-so-series about Emacs configuration. Today I will describe my configuration for managing the compilation-error-regexp-alist variable in a way that is meaningful for the current project I’m working on. Some time ago I faced a problem that the compilation-error-regexp-alist variable contains far too many entries for different languages by default.
I’ve been into clojure.core.async lately, and I like the overall design of this library - it’s simple and easy to understand. However, at work, we use manifold in our projects, mainly because it is supported by the aleph server, which was chosen because it can asynchronously read data coming from the client.
This is a follow-up to my previous post regarding the bug in the clojure.core.async/pipeline-async function. As I’ve mentioned at the end of that post, I’ve submitted a patch to Ask Clojure that should fix the off by two error for the asynchronous pipeline.
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