Andrey Listopadov

Tags / clojure

Recently, I decided to try the now inbuilt LSP client called Eglot. I’ve been using the lsp-mode package for some years and while I don’t have any problems with it, I decided to try the in-house solution. Though, I already tried Eglot in the past, and it didn’t work for me, due to some complications with the language I’ve tried to use it with.
After I explored asynchronous programming in my first naive implementation a few years ago, I was hooked on the idea of asynchronous communication in programs. Motivated to take this concept further I’ve created the fennel-async library that I’ve shown at FennelConf 2022. While this library works, and I’ve managed to write a simple socket-based REPL and integrate it into Emacs as an experiment, I wasn’t satisfied with the implementation.
Another post in the not-so-series about Emacs configuration. Today I will describe my configuration for managing the compilation-error-regexp-alist variable in a way that is meaningful for the current project I’m working on. Some time ago I faced a problem that the compilation-error-regexp-alist variable contains far too many entries for different languages by default.
I’ve been into clojure.core.async lately, and I like the overall design of this library - it’s simple and easy to understand. However, at work, we use manifold in our projects, mainly because it is supported by the aleph server, which was chosen because it can asynchronously read data coming from the client.
This is a follow-up to my previous post regarding the bug in the clojure.core.async/pipeline-async function. As I’ve mentioned at the end of that post, I’ve submitted a patch to Ask Clojure that should fix the off by two error for the asynchronous pipeline.
Quite recently I’ve been working on my asynchronous programming library for Fennel, and fiddling with clojure.core.async at the same time for my other project. I’ve found an interesting function, called pipeline-async, which seemed to be a good fit for my task. Here’s the documentation for this function:

Recently I’ve stumped upon a Reddit thread about defining a function that you can call a limited amount of times in Rust, with compile-time check, and I wondered if I can make the same thing in Clojure.

Some time ago I ported most of Clojure’s core namespace to Fennel and made it into a library called fennel-cljlib. This was my first library for Fennel, so it wasn’t really great in terms of how it was implemented. While it was making Fennel more like Clojure syntax-wise, which I like, it wasn’t following Clojure’s semantics that well.
A while ago I’ve watched this amazing talk: Condition Systems in an Exceptional Language by Chris Houser. And more recently I’ve found one interesting library called farolero, which provides a set of functions and macros that mimic Common Lisp’s condition system. So I was generally interested in the topic and decided to give it a shot and try both approaches.
Today we’ll take a look at an interesting Java library, called PF4J, which describes itself as a Plugin Framework for Java. The main purpose of this library is to provide a way of detecting, initializing, and using plugins to extend your Java application with new features without the need to modify the code.
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